Utilization of Whole, Fractioned, or Ground Teeth for DNA Microbial Testing: Is There a Difference?

By Leslie Douglas, PhD, Blanche D. Grube, DMD, and Anita Vazquez Tibau

Introduction

The impact that oral health has on whole body health is no longer a question; in fact, over 100 systemic diseases have been linked to poor oral health. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) almost half of the global population has an oral disease of some kind. Oral diseases include dental decay, gum disease, and oral cancers. While oral diseases are largely preventable, tooth decay is the most common disease globally. What are now accepted as causative factors of oral cavities include oral microorganisms, oral environment, host, and time.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has stated that periodontal disease affects almost 50% of those over 30 years old, and over 70% of those over 65 years old in the US. Statistically, periodontal disease is more common in men, those who are below the poverty level, those with less than a high school education, and current smokers. Observation of oral microbiota is a major indicator for the occurrence, development, and prognosis of disease. Oral bacteria can be used as a biomarker to potentially measure disease risk.

Please read the full paper in the Townsend Letter HERE.

 

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